About your Search

20130201
20130228
SHOW
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 71
KQED (PBS) 38
WETA 36
KRCB (PBS) 20
WMPT (PBS) 4
WUSA (CBS) 4
LANGUAGE
English 173
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> welcome to the program. tonight we begin with new orleans the city, and three people who recently moved back here because of their love of it. reflecting are james carville, mary matalin and julia reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wou
with other urban areas so we can reenvironment allize this country from the cities out. >> "the wall street journal" recently said young nerds with laptops. >> my favorite, my boyfriend. i'm a cougar to the young nerds with laptops. >> rose: are moving to new orleanses from new york and san francisco. >> yeah. >> rose: so these are smart people looking to have a good life, who know that in today's world where you can be anywhere, where distance and time are no longer as big a factor as it used to be you can do it all. >> let me give you an example what this means. music is huge, clint davis, he puts on gas ferx the super bowl. i said clint, what is the status of music right now. he said we're in a golden era. we have street bands everywhere. there are 150 different bands that are playing this weekend in new orleans. and so but what is happened is if you think of a street band, the way this guys exist is by tips. and whether what do we carry that young people don't carry, cash, money. >> okay. and so they've developed an app, these silicon via guys that you can tip with your cell phone. so t
most of your time in new york city. i kind of know where you live and so i wonder well, how come you're not here more often? >> dave: well, you're here everyday! soor than you nobody seems to be coming a lot. (laughter) >> dave: but there are people -- there are people i never want to see again and people i would like to have on a regular basis. >> all right. >> dave: you come on a regular basis. last time you were here -- when was the last time? >> i think it was a year ago. >> dave: a year ago! 20 minutes. >> well, i don't need this. (laughter) >> dave: i'm so dumb. >> well what do you mean? >> dave: out of friendship i thought -- >> well, friendship -- if you have a friend you usually don't have the to prepare a standup set. (laughter) to hang out with a friend. >> dave: well, true. >> dave: but it's nice to see you. >> thank you, that's all i want to hear. i'm a big believer in portion control. i think if i came as often as you want you wouldn't like me so much. >> dave: no, no, no, no. here's another thing, just a word to the wise. you have this little show on crackle -- (laught
is serving for car theft in charles county. city prosecutors said they had nothing to do with it. >> are learning a baltimore city circuit court judge has dismissed the lawsuit by baltimore controller over the plan to install new phone system and it is an update to the story the i-team has been falling. accusing the mayor of subverting the bidding process. >> bankruptcy may be the only option for the city of baltimore 10 years down the road if officials do not make some major cuts and reforms. that is part of a city ordered to report what it says. the forecast was published by public financial management, inc.. if the city continues its spending trend it will be more than $2 billion in the hole. $745 million includes a budget deficit, failing infrastructure as well as health care and pension benefits accounts for $1.30 billion of the potential shortfall. >> if we act now we cabn teens the trajectory. >> the mayor highlights of your key themes for cuts including identifying strategies to align recurring revenues, reducing property and income taxes, addressing infrastructure, and a
in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore o ddt age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it. so this book is about the question of what are the drivers that are chan
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate ov school refo. sh has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, icut a central office beaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's d
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of sta fro 1997 to001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is something that was started i
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the united states constitution is over 225 years old. though our nation has transformed since the document was ratified, this text has remained largely unchanged. some scholars question relevance of the constitution in the modern day, others insist we must strictly adhere to the words of our founders, akhil amar suggests that we look beyond the text. he is the sterling professor at yale law school and a constitutional law scholar. his new book is called america's unwritten constitution, the precedence and principleses we live by. i am pleased to have him at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> so what about this love affair with the constitution that you have, did it come from undergraduate z it come from law school, did it come from some sense of america and its -- >> it came from the day that i was born and because the day i'm born in ann arbor, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first se
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia tomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. she grew up in a public housing project in the south bronx. at age seven she was diagnosed with type one diabetes. her father a factory worker died the following year. she and her younger brother were raised by a single mom who worked long hours just to make ends meet. but adversity did not stop her from ascending to the top of her profession. she went from high school valedictorian to princeton graduate to law review editor at yale. she served as a prosecutor and a corpate late gator before she was appointed as a district court judge. while still in her 30s. and then was appointed to the court of appeals. 11 years later she was sworn in as the nation's 111th justice. she tells her personal story in a new memoir. is it called "my beloved world." i am very pleased to have justice sonia sotomayor at this table for the first time. we
should follow the example of a new york city nurse named menchu sanchez. when hurricane sandy plunged her hospital into darkness she wasn't thinking about how her own home was faring. her mind was on the 20 precious newborns in her care and the rescue plan she devised that kept them all safe. we should follow the example of a north miami woman named desaline victor. when she arrived at her polling place she was told the wait to vote might be six hours. and as time ticked by, her concern was not with her tired body or aching feet or whether folks like her would get to have their say. hour after hour a throng of people stayed in line to support her because desiline is 102 years old. they erupted in cheers when she finally put on a sticker that read, "i voted." ( applause ) there's desiline. we should follow the example of a police officer named brian murphy. when a gunman opened fire on a siek temple in wisconsin, brian was the first to arrive. he did not consider his own safety. he fought back until help arrived and ordered his fellow officers to protect the safety of the fellow americans
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)